Skip to content

Tag Archives: social networking

War Of Words: Why the Irish bloggetariat has yet to worry the commentariat

Mick ‘Slugger O’Toole‘ Fealty declared yesterday that ‘bloggers have won’ the argument with the commentariat, opinion formers who exert their influence through newspaper columns. Well, maybe in some parts of the world, but there’s scant evidence that battle has even been joined in the Republic. Here, the Old Media (and that includes me) trundles on, […]

Poll Topper

This week, this blog quietly marked it’s first anniversary. The first post here appeared on 27 May last year, two hundred words on an item covering the wearing of the hijab, religious freedom and tolerance. I have no idea how many hits that post garnered, I didn’t bother tracking hits to the blog until a […]

A Picture Is Worth…?

Local election candidate Emma Kiernan broke out of the local media to gain (perhaps fleeting) national fame this week, thanks to the interweb. Kiernan, a Fine Gael candidate running for a spot on Newbridge town council, is young, attractive, and like many of her friends, she has a facebook profile. Like everyone else on Facebook, […]

Listen and Learn

Last night I went along to a meeting of bloggers and politicians arranged by Green TD Ciaran Cuffe. A tour of the Green party offices was followed by a round table discussion involving between about twenty bloggers, Cuffe, John Gormley and Deirdre de Burca. Eventually, we got to the point: How can politicians best use […]

Old News

This week, the Leitrim Post closed its doors, laying off five people. This follows the closure of the Niall Mellon backed Voice group at the end of 2008. So far, no established provincial newspaper has folded. But several provincial titles, some with decades of history, are on thin ice. On a national level, the Sunday […]

Newsworthy

More than thirteen thousand people joined a Facebook group urging Slovenia’s ‘perennial foreign minister’ Dimitrij Rupel to retire from political life. The Slovenians are annoyed that Rupel remains a member of the government, despite his party losing a recent election. Rupel, a flexible politician, had been a member of four parties during his career, and […]